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Why might our book list help?

We asked one young person how using the books on our book list had helped her.
One of the Primary Mental Health Work Team in Highland had recommended Badger’s Parting Gifts by Susan Varley to her and her Mum after her Grandad had died. She was worried about how everyone was coping, and even read it with her Gran. This was what she thought about it:

How did the book help you to talk about Grandad’s death?

  • The book made me feel like I wasn’t alone and I got more confidence to talk about it.

Did the book make it easier to talk about death?

  • I understood that it was easier to talk to someone about it.

Did it help?

  • I felt much better once I read the book.

Did it help Granny?

  • My Gran felt better after I read it to her.  I felt sad before I read the book but after I felt more comfortable.

The book helped me and Granny to talk about our memories of Grandad.  At the start I thought it wasn’t okay to cry but when Granny started to cry I felt that I could cry too, because it was a sad time.

Thank you Lucy for sharing your thoughts on Badger’s Parting Gifts.

Is Seasons for Growth helpful? We asked a pupil who has taken part in a group.

Seasons for Growth Level 3 by Anne P Graham 

Someone close to me died. Before the group i felt like i couldn’t talk about it to other people.

I realised I could talk about it because other people have experienced the same type of thing.

I was a bit nervous in the beginning but after a few weeks I realised I didn’t need to be  nervous.

Over time I started to enjoy the group. I would 100% recommend it to someone going through the same thing.   

Aiden Primary 7

Muddles, Puddles and Sunshine

Muddles, Puddles and Sunshine, written by Diana Crossley and illustrated by Kate Sheppard is an activity book for bereaved children that we often recommend to Parents and Schools.
Children can dip in and out of the activities; picking the ones that they are interested in. We have been fortunate enough to see it in use and it has allowed for children to complete activities with their families or with trusted members of staff. In completing the activities, children often find it easier to talk about their loss with the trusted adult.

Don’t just take our word for it though! Here is a review of the book from a pupil who used it last year, with the support of a Pupil Support Assistant:

“Someone close to me died I was really upset.

 Sometimes I struggled to stay in class.

This activity book helped me remember good memories about the person. It also helped to talk about the person.

The memory jar was my favourite activity in the book it was my favourite because it was fun to do.

Sometimes it helped me distract myself from being upset.

I brought the jar home and still sometimes look at it to remind me about the person.”

By Aiden, Primary 7

Featured

Welcome to CLB Highland

Morning all, and a very warm welcome to our new website. As a group of professionals, we realised that collectively we share a lot of information and resources about change and loss with our colleagues, with families and with Children and Young People. However, we also realised that we didn’t have one place that everyone could go to access all of this.
As a result, we have been working on this website, that anyone can access, to find out about the support available in Highland when experiencing Change, Loss or Bereavement.
The website is still under construction, and will continue to be added to over the coming months. We hope to be able to share relevant resources, signpost to support available, point you in the direction of useful websites and also for families, children & young people and practitioners to share with us what has worked for them and why.
This blog will be used to share reviews of books, of support we have accessed, theory, training and anything else relevant to the Highland Community in terms of Change and Loss.
Thank you for joining us on the journey, and for your patience while we develop the site. Sign up to the blog to receive regular updates as we progress.